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archiemcphee:

Garry ”Stretch” Turner promotes Priceless London Wonderground, which brings a taste of 20th century Coney Island to 21st century London. The show will be at the Southbank Centre until late September. We’re wondering if they have any other entertainers who resemble our sets of classic sideshow figures.
For those of you who are curious about how “Stretch” does what he does (and who wouldn’t be?): Garry suffers from an extreme form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a connective tissue disorder that makes his skin incredibly elastic. According to this Joe.ie post, he is also currently the holder of a Guinness World Record for putting 158 wooden clothespins on his face. Well done Garry!
Photo by Tony Kyriacou
[via Telegraph.co.uk]

archiemcphee:

Garry ”Stretch” Turner promotes Priceless London Wonderground, which brings a taste of 20th century Coney Island to 21st century London. The show will be at the Southbank Centre until late September. We’re wondering if they have any other entertainers who resemble our sets of classic sideshow figures.

For those of you who are curious about how “Stretch” does what he does (and who wouldn’t be?): Garry suffers from an extreme form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a connective tissue disorder that makes his skin incredibly elastic. According to this Joe.ie post, he is also currently the holder of a Guinness World Record for putting 158 wooden clothespins on his face. Well done Garry!

Photo by Tony Kyriacou

[via Telegraph.co.uk]

archiemcphee:

Our exQuisite Corpse commissions the Huichol people of Western Mexico to create these awesome beaded works of art. Huichol artisans painstakingly cover human and animal skulls with intricate patters of tiny, colorful beads. Because each one-of-a-kind piece is beaded using wax, they need to be kept away from heat and the sun.

The finished Human Skulls (made of resin, not bone, just in case anyone was wondering) all appear deliriously happy. The longer we look at them, the more we can’t help starting to grin right along with them.

While they’re all gorgeous, our favourite piece has got to be the stunning life-sized replica Giraffe Skull complete with beaded vertebrate. 

[via Clutter]

archiemcphee:

Behold the ghostly Kermode bear (Ursus americanus kermodei), also known as the “Spirit Bear”, a subspecies of the American Black Bear living in the central and north coast of British Columbia, Canada. Approximately 1/10 of their population are born with white or cream-coloured coats of fur like you see in these beautiful photos. They are not albinos or related to the Polar bear. This colour morph is due to a recessive allele common in the population. 

National Geographic estimates the spirit bear population at 400-1000 individuals, saying that “the spirit bear may owe its survival to the protective traditions of the First Nations, who never hunted the animals or spoke of them to fur trappers”

In addition to their awesome appearance, the Kermode bears are also particularly successful fishermenbears:

Scientists have found that black bears are not as effective at catching fish as white bears, as the white bears are less visible from the perspective of the fish. While at night the two colors of bears have similar success rates at catching fish, such as salmon, during the day the white bears are 30% more effective.

Photos by Paul Nicklen via National Geographic

archiemcphee:

Check out these awesome gifs by UK artist Insa, created in cooperation with Unga of the Broken Fingaz Crew who was visiting from Israel. That’s a pretty sweet street collaboration.

[via Robot:Mafia]

archiemcphee:

“The Minister’s Treehouse in Crossville, Tennessee is a 100ft structure built by minister Horace Burgess from the early 1990s through 2004. The entire building wraps around a giant tree and was built completely without blueprints, sprawling to an estimated 10,000 square feet inside, including a four-story swing set. Photographer Kristin Sweeting took a recent trip to the treehouse and took many of the photos above.”

Visit Colossal to view more images of this awesome treehouse. You can also see more images by Chuck Sutherland who provided the top image.

archiemcphee:

We’ve featured the creative work of Minneapolis-based designer, illustrator, and artist Phil Jones at least a few times before. While we like everything we’ve seen by him thus far, we’re particularly taken with his Lost Signs street art series. Here are a few of our favourites.

[via thaeger]